Sunday, 2 February 2014

There was a 5 Star Bore Today along the River Severn

I readily accepted an invitation to look at a 5star bore in the River Severn, because I'd never experienced it, despite spending time in the area several years ago. The predicted time for the bore to pass Stonebench where we were was 9.50am, we arrived slightly before this and joined the others waiting, it can be up to half an hour earlier than predicted because it's a tidal surge from the sea, dependent on weather conditions and winds. Here's more from SOGLOS:

The Severn Bore is caused by the tide from the Atlantic Ocean entering the Bristol Channel and forcing its way into the Severn Estuary, filtering into a narrow channel and causing the water to rise by anything up to 15 metres. The water reaches speeds of up to 20kmph as it nears Minsterworth and, as the width of the River Severn narrows, becomes held up causing the natural bore phenomenon. - See more at:http://www.soglos.com/sport-outdoor/28010/The-Severn-Bore#sthash.TSc8XRhG.dpuf
 Flooded roads meant we had to be carefully navigated around closed roads, and walked the last part of the route, past a primary school, over a canal along, a road before reaching the river:
 When we arrived around 9.10am, there were already quite a few people waiting on the river bank, the sun soon changed to rain:
 And dullness as we waited fortified by coffee and cereal bars..

 And waited a bit more, bored children were warned about the possible high wave and how we might need to rush to higher ground when it came.
 When it did come, people could smell the salt water, but the wave was very small, it can just be seen above as a small wave on the left hand side of the photo. above. The children were not impressed.
 After the wave because the river was so full already, the water kept rising as though the tide was coming in very quickly and was more interesting to watch than the approach of the bore.

 Here you can see the strong currents as the water rushes in.

  And as we walked away and saw the bank where we had been standing was completely submerged, it was very dramatic.




We were home in time for Desert Island Discs, but it was a morning to remember, definitely worth another viewing when the river is not so flooded.

The Severn Bore is caused by the tide from the Atlantic Ocean entering the Bristol Channel and forcing its way into the Severn Estuary, filtering into a narrow channel and causing the water to rise by anything up to 15 metres. The water reaches speeds of up to 20kmph as it nears Minsterworth and, as the width of the River Severn narrows, becomes held up causing the natural bore phenomenon. - See more at: http://www.soglos.com/sport-outdoor/28010/The-Severn-Bore#sthash.TSc8XRhG.dpuf
The Severn Bore is caused by the tide from the Atlantic Ocean entering the Bristol Channel and forcing its way into the Severn Estuary, filtering into a narrow channel and causing the water to rise by anything up to 15 metres. The water reaches speeds of up to 20kmph as it nears Minsterworth and, as the width of the River Severn narrows, becomes held up causing the natural bore phenomenon. - See more at: http://www.soglos.com/sport-outdoor/28010/The-Severn-Bore#sthash.TSc8XRhG.dpuf
The Severn Bore is caused by the tide from the Atlantic Ocean entering the Bristol Channel and forcing its way into the Severn Estuary, filtering into a narrow channel and causing the water to rise by anything up to 15 metres. The water reaches speeds of up to 20kmph as it nears Minsterworth and, as the width of the River Severn narrows, becomes held up causing the natural bore phenomenon. - See more at: http://www.soglos.com/sport-outdoor/28010/The-Severn-Bore#sthash.TSc8XRhG.dpuf
The Severn Bore is caused by the tide from the Atlantic Ocean entering the Bristol Channel and forcing its way into the Severn Estuary, filtering into a narrow channel and causing the water to rise by anything up to 15 metres. The water reaches speeds of up to 20kmph as it nears Minsterworth and, as the width of the River Severn narrows, becomes held up causing the natural bore phenomenon. - See more at: http://www.soglos.com/sport-outdoor/28010/The-Severn-Bore#sthash.TSc8XRhG.dpuf
The Severn Bore is caused by the tide from the Atlantic Ocean entering the Bristol Channel and forcing its way into the Severn Estuary, filtering into a narrow channel and causing the water to rise by anything up to 15 metres. The water reaches speeds of up to 20kmph as it nears Minsterworth and, as the width of the River Severn narrows, becomes held up causing the natural bore phenomenon. - See more at: http://www.soglos.com/sport-outdoor/28010/The-Severn-Bore#sthash.TSc8XRhG.dpuf
The Severn Bore is caused by the tide from the Atlantic Ocean entering the Bristol Channel and forcing its way into the Severn Estuary, filtering into a narrow channel and causing the water to rise by anything up to 15 metres. The water reaches speeds of up to 20kmph as it nears Minsterworth and, as the width of the River Severn narrows, becomes held up causing the natural bore phenomenon. - See more at: http://www.soglos.com/sport-outdoor/28010/The-Severn-Bore#sthash.TSc8XRhG.dpuf
The Severn Bore is caused by the tide from the Atlantic Ocean entering the Bristol Channel and forcing its way into the Severn Estuary, filtering into a narrow channel and causing the water to rise by anything up to 15 metres. The water reaches speeds of up to 20kmph as it nears Minsterworth and, as the width of the River Severn narrows, becomes held up causing the natural bore phenomenon. - See more at: http://www.soglos.com/sport-outdoor/28010/The-Severn-Bore#sthash.TSc8XRhG.dpuf

No comments:

Post a Comment