Tuesday, 25 February 2014

Exhibition at the Central Library Gallery during March

We are fortunate to be able to display artwork in the Central Library Gallery during March.
Everyone is welcome to submit work for the exhibition; the handing in date is Saturday 1st of March between 11am-12noon, it will remain there until the 29th of March and be collected between 11am-12noon.
I already have some work to hang from  previous exhibition, and have permission to display it to advertise the exhibition.
Maggie Harris's gorgeous stork:
 and Sophie Corrigan's much loved multi media piece:

 It's going to be hard to part with them when they have to be sold or returned to their owners, I have got used to looking at them.
Sophie has suggested another piece to hang, one of her gorgeous cats, which I won't add here, it can be a surprise.
Bev Greig has kindly agreed to let us hang one of her Bampton series paintings, and Pat Elmore will bring a herd of sheep for the courtyard.
And hopefully there will be lots more work to hang, come and have a look during March.


Monday, 24 February 2014

Jaime Bullock's Final Farewell to the Landing Arts Gallery

Many people who have visited the Arts Centre in Devizes Road over the last 2 years, will have noticed the landing linking the two buildings at the Arts Centre has been used very effectively as a gallery space with paintings changed every month, and an opening night to introduce the artist. Jaime Bullock has run this really brilliantly, but now due to a change in management at the Arts Centre, is no longer able to do so.
Her final event is next Saturday March 1st at 4.30pm to celebrate the wonderful 2 years of the gallery's existence.
Try and get along for a last look and the gallery and Jaime as  hostess.
www.swindon.gov.uk/artscentre

Saturday, 22 February 2014

Galanthophiles Gathered at Cerney House

Maybe it's an exceptionally good year for Galanthus, snowdrops to most of us, I'm not sure, I have never seen them in quite the same way as I did yesterday at Cerney House gardens. I became a lover of snowdrops, a Galanthophile along with many other people delighted by the snowdrop walk at Cerney House where there are an astonishing number of different varieties of snowdrops.
I didn't photograph the name of this one, but there was a 'j' part way through it, probably my favourite, there are 2 flowers side by side with yellow spots around the frilled petals. :

 There are 2 flowers here with yellow spots around the frilled petals.
There were carpets of snowdrops:
And features like boxing hares:
 And a lovely seating arrangement:
And many different varieties of Hellebores:

The house is majestic:
 The walled garden even in February has a host of interesting features like this box hedge, one of many.
Looking at different snowdrop sites, one of the most fascinating one was this:
http://www.harveysgardenplants.co.uk/galanthus.asp    which shows how many people have discovered their own snowdrop variety and named it after themselves, or where they live.

Wednesday, 19 February 2014

Opening Night at the Beehive tonight

Sherry Iravani and Sherry Allen's joint watercolour exhibition at the Beehive has its opening night from 7pm onwards at the Beehive. If you are feeling spontaneous and not going to the film society, it would be a perfect destination for this evening. The fire was burning brightly an hour ago:
Sadly Jane's back gave way as she was standing up having made up and lit the fire, hopefully she will feel better soon.
Back to the exhibition, here's a poster advertising tonight's private view:
And here are a few photos of the exhibition:




If you can't get there tonight, try and pay the Beehive a visit before the end of February.


Sunday, 16 February 2014

Venus Visible at Sunrise, Frogs Mating and Snowdrops Flowering

What a day! After weeks of rain, wind and very little sun, today was gloriously sunny all day which was good news for those who ran the 10k in aid of Prospect with donations from Nationwide.
My day started around 6am when I saw Venus shining very brightly and continuing to do so until the sun had completely risen:


 In the photo below, Venus can only just be seen!
It's going to be possible to get views like this of Venus for the whole month if the sky is clear at sunrise, it's worth setting the alarm to have a look.
The sun during the day seemed to encourage the snowdrops to open more fully, the double ones in particular seemed to develop almost curly petals:
 The single ones also seemed to have grown really tall:
The pond has been inspected daily for frogspawn, with no evidence of it at all, but late this afternoon, when I walked by the pond, there was a splashing sound and bubbles came to the surface; I think there are frogs in there, hopefully mating.

Flight meets Bike exhibition

David Bent is currently exhibiting aviation inspired art with iconic bikes with paintwork by internationally renowned paint specialist Ty Lawer in Bury St.Edmunds for 6 weeks from the 8th of February. More on the the motorbikes and links to the exhibition at Krazy Horse
Photographs below:

An article on the exhibition in the Bury St.Edmunds local paper:
http://issuu.com/brightpublishing/docs/buryedition_february/12

Wednesday, 12 February 2014

The Wet Paint Gallery has a Sale On

The Wet Paint Gallery in Cirencester is very easily reached from the A419, take the second turning off the dual carriageway heading towards Gloucester, then just across the first roundabout, and the WPG is on your left, with a car park conveniently placed bedside it.
There's a sale on there at the moment, so even more incentive to pay them a visit. Last Saturday the 8th of February was the opening day, so there was a celebratory atmosphere, wine and nibbles.
You can see lots of wine glasses amid the tulips and below highly desirable prints by two of my favourite artists, Edward Bawden and Eric Ravilious.
 Above more prints, and below a gorgeous horse sculpture partly hidden by posters.
 And in the window, wire netting animal lovers.
The books are great:

Also for sale lovely cards, postcards and posters advertising previous exhibitions:

I bought the Eric Gill one and Edward Bawden one.
For more details on the Wet Paint Gallery have a look at their website, and go along and have a look.
It's worth mentioning that they are open Thursday-Saturday.

Tuesday, 11 February 2014

A Fourth Woodstore

Someone said last week that when you have a woodburning stove, you become a 'wood monster', forever collecting wood. The wood also needs to be stored, hence another wood store seen below with its proud builder:
 Loading up the woodstore. When done properly with sawn edges, the store can look very lovely. But why has the Severn Bore writing appeared? I can't get rid of it.

Tuesday, 4 February 2014

Sophie Corrigan at the Beehive this Year

Sophie Corrigan has booked the Beehive walls for Open Studios this year. I'm raising three cheers for Sophie as our first participating artist in 2014. Thank you for joining us once again this year.
Any more people ready to join?
 I can then remove the 2013 Participants from the blog and substitute 2014 participants.
Sophie makes amazing pictures. Here are 3 images of Sophie's work:


Aren't they lovely? I think last years show in the Beehive was a virtual sell out, so we're looking forward to this years rural living inspired work.

Sunday, 2 February 2014

There was a 5 Star Bore Today along the River Severn

I readily accepted an invitation to look at a 5star bore in the River Severn, because I'd never experienced it, despite spending time in the area several years ago. The predicted time for the bore to pass Stonebench where we were was 9.50am, we arrived slightly before this and joined the others waiting, it can be up to half an hour earlier than predicted because it's a tidal surge from the sea, dependent on weather conditions and winds. Here's more from SOGLOS:

The Severn Bore is caused by the tide from the Atlantic Ocean entering the Bristol Channel and forcing its way into the Severn Estuary, filtering into a narrow channel and causing the water to rise by anything up to 15 metres. The water reaches speeds of up to 20kmph as it nears Minsterworth and, as the width of the River Severn narrows, becomes held up causing the natural bore phenomenon. - See more at:http://www.soglos.com/sport-outdoor/28010/The-Severn-Bore#sthash.TSc8XRhG.dpuf
 Flooded roads meant we had to be carefully navigated around closed roads, and walked the last part of the route, past a primary school, over a canal along, a road before reaching the river:
 When we arrived around 9.10am, there were already quite a few people waiting on the river bank, the sun soon changed to rain:
 And dullness as we waited fortified by coffee and cereal bars..

 And waited a bit more, bored children were warned about the possible high wave and how we might need to rush to higher ground when it came.
 When it did come, people could smell the salt water, but the wave was very small, it can just be seen above as a small wave on the left hand side of the photo. above. The children were not impressed.
 After the wave because the river was so full already, the water kept rising as though the tide was coming in very quickly and was more interesting to watch than the approach of the bore.

 Here you can see the strong currents as the water rushes in.

  And as we walked away and saw the bank where we had been standing was completely submerged, it was very dramatic.




We were home in time for Desert Island Discs, but it was a morning to remember, definitely worth another viewing when the river is not so flooded.

The Severn Bore is caused by the tide from the Atlantic Ocean entering the Bristol Channel and forcing its way into the Severn Estuary, filtering into a narrow channel and causing the water to rise by anything up to 15 metres. The water reaches speeds of up to 20kmph as it nears Minsterworth and, as the width of the River Severn narrows, becomes held up causing the natural bore phenomenon. - See more at: http://www.soglos.com/sport-outdoor/28010/The-Severn-Bore#sthash.TSc8XRhG.dpuf
The Severn Bore is caused by the tide from the Atlantic Ocean entering the Bristol Channel and forcing its way into the Severn Estuary, filtering into a narrow channel and causing the water to rise by anything up to 15 metres. The water reaches speeds of up to 20kmph as it nears Minsterworth and, as the width of the River Severn narrows, becomes held up causing the natural bore phenomenon. - See more at: http://www.soglos.com/sport-outdoor/28010/The-Severn-Bore#sthash.TSc8XRhG.dpuf
The Severn Bore is caused by the tide from the Atlantic Ocean entering the Bristol Channel and forcing its way into the Severn Estuary, filtering into a narrow channel and causing the water to rise by anything up to 15 metres. The water reaches speeds of up to 20kmph as it nears Minsterworth and, as the width of the River Severn narrows, becomes held up causing the natural bore phenomenon. - See more at: http://www.soglos.com/sport-outdoor/28010/The-Severn-Bore#sthash.TSc8XRhG.dpuf
The Severn Bore is caused by the tide from the Atlantic Ocean entering the Bristol Channel and forcing its way into the Severn Estuary, filtering into a narrow channel and causing the water to rise by anything up to 15 metres. The water reaches speeds of up to 20kmph as it nears Minsterworth and, as the width of the River Severn narrows, becomes held up causing the natural bore phenomenon. - See more at: http://www.soglos.com/sport-outdoor/28010/The-Severn-Bore#sthash.TSc8XRhG.dpuf
The Severn Bore is caused by the tide from the Atlantic Ocean entering the Bristol Channel and forcing its way into the Severn Estuary, filtering into a narrow channel and causing the water to rise by anything up to 15 metres. The water reaches speeds of up to 20kmph as it nears Minsterworth and, as the width of the River Severn narrows, becomes held up causing the natural bore phenomenon. - See more at: http://www.soglos.com/sport-outdoor/28010/The-Severn-Bore#sthash.TSc8XRhG.dpuf
The Severn Bore is caused by the tide from the Atlantic Ocean entering the Bristol Channel and forcing its way into the Severn Estuary, filtering into a narrow channel and causing the water to rise by anything up to 15 metres. The water reaches speeds of up to 20kmph as it nears Minsterworth and, as the width of the River Severn narrows, becomes held up causing the natural bore phenomenon. - See more at: http://www.soglos.com/sport-outdoor/28010/The-Severn-Bore#sthash.TSc8XRhG.dpuf
The Severn Bore is caused by the tide from the Atlantic Ocean entering the Bristol Channel and forcing its way into the Severn Estuary, filtering into a narrow channel and causing the water to rise by anything up to 15 metres. The water reaches speeds of up to 20kmph as it nears Minsterworth and, as the width of the River Severn narrows, becomes held up causing the natural bore phenomenon. - See more at: http://www.soglos.com/sport-outdoor/28010/The-Severn-Bore#sthash.TSc8XRhG.dpuf